The Moon revolves or orbits the Earth in an elliptical or egg shaped orbit. The closest point in the Moon's orbit about the Earth is called perigee. The furthest point is called apogee. At 5:24 A.M. Central Standard Time (CST) on Monday, November 14, the Moon will be only 221,524 miles away. This would be […]

The Moon revolves or orbits the Earth in an elliptical or egg shaped orbit. The closest point in the Moon's orbit about the Earth is called perigee. The furthest point is called apogee.
At 5:24 A.M. Central Standard Time (CST) on Monday, November 14, the Moon will be only 221,524 miles away. This would be the closest it has been to the Earth since January 26, 1948.
However, the distance between the Earth and the Moon is actually measured from the centers of the celestial bodies. The radius of the Earth is about 3,968.5 miles while the radius of the Moon is 1.081.5 miles. Therefore, since we are viewing both celestial bodies from their surfaces, and not from their centers, we must subtract 5,050 miles (1,081.5 miles + 3,968,5 miles) from the total to get 216,474 miles, the actual distance the Moon will be from us at that time.
The Moon will not be this close again until November 25, 2034. It is a celestial event worth watching.