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The Kansan - Newton, KS
  • Ag in brief

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  • Sorghum Production Schools planned for February
    MANHATTAN – Kansas State University will host its Sorghum Production School in four locations around the state in February. The closest school will be Feb. 13 in Wichita.
    The schools address such issues as risk management, irrigation management, production practices, nutrient and soil fertility, and weed, insect and disease management, said Ignacio Ciampitti, crop production specialist with K-State Research and Extension.
    New to the program this year are sessions focusing on the use of new technologies, such as web tools and mobile apps.
    “Kansas is the No. 1 producer of grain sorghum in the United States and we’re committed to working with producers in growing the most productive crop in the most efficient way possible,” Ciampitti said.
    The program, which is similar at each location, begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. Each sorghum school includes lunch. There is no cost to register, but participants are asked to pre-register before Feb. 3.
    Online registration is available at http://bit.ly/KSUSorghum or by emailing or calling the location at which participants plan to attend.
    ‘Women Managing the Farm Conference’ Planned
    MANHATTAN — Women have always been an integral part of American agriculture but never more than today. The “Women Managing the Farm Conference,” Feb. 13 and 14 in Manhattan, Kan., will provide educational and networking opportunities for women involved in key facets of the industry.
    The conference, with the theme this year, “The Heart of Agriculture,” begins with registration at 8 a.m. on Feb. 13, and adjourns at 2 p.m. on Feb. 14. All activities will be held at Manhattan’s Hilton Garden Inn.
    “The conference being on Valentine’s Day lends an immediate connection to women’s hearts,” said Janet Barrows, vice-president of marketing and communications with Frontier Farm Credit, and Women Managing the Farm Conference chair. “Women really are the heart of agriculture. They are at the heart of business matters and often keep families connected. They are often in agriculture either because they love agriculture or love someone who is involved in a farm or ranch.”
    Winter crop update set for Feb. 12
    KINGMAN —The Kingman and Harper county extension offices will host a Winter Crop Update and sponsored lunch on from 10 a.m. tp 2 p.m.  Feb. 12  at the Kingman County Activity Center, 121 S. Main St. in Kingman.
    “We will have K-State speakers discussing wheat disease and outlook, insects and scouting in wheat and canola, fertilizer and weed control in wheat and canola, and finally, the market outlook for wheat and canola,” said Michael Owen, K-State Research and Extension agriculture and natural resources agent in Kingman County.
    There is no charge to attend, but attendees are asked to register by Friday, Feb. 7 to ensure an accurate head count for the meal, sponsored by Cody Bergman of American AgCredit in Kingman. To register, call the Kingman County K-State Research and Extension office at 620-532-5131 or email Owen at mowen@ksu.edu.
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