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The Kansan - Newton, KS
Morning Sights
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By Katie Stockstill-Sawyer
March 30, 2013 5:30 p.m.



Now that I work in Wichita, I don’t have the time or ability to enjoy morning runs on our dusty dirt roads. So I take advantage of the opportunities I do have to get out and about and enjoy the sights of our farm.

During my Saturday morning walk with the dogs, I got to see a few of our bulls, a portion of our first-calf heifers and their calves, which grow larger and stronger each day.

The boys of the Sawyer Farm enjoy lazy days of grazing and napping on the pasture north of our house. In April, they will be moved to pasture with the cows to begin breeding season.

The boys of the Sawyer Farm enjoy lazy days of grazing and napping on the pasture north of our house. In April, they will be moved to pasture with the cows to begin breeding season.



This morning, as usual, the heifers and their calves were waiting patiently for breakfast as I embarked on my walk. By the time I returned they were enjoy a ration of corn silage, dry distillers grain and other feed stuffs from our farm. The calves are just becoming old enough to digest the solid food but rely on their mother’s milk for most of their daily nutritional needs.

Breakfast is a highly anticipated event for our cows and their calves. Each morning, the ladies wait patiently by the bunk for their morning meal.

Breakfast is a highly anticipated event for our cows and their calves. Each morning, the ladies wait patiently by the bunk for their morning meal.



While we humans like to enjoy a late breakfast – or brunch – on the weekends, our cows believe in a regular eating time – 7 days a week. So we must get up and around to make sure they are feed and happy, regardless of what day it is.

Most of our animals will be leaving our farm for pasture ground in April. They will spend their summer grazing on green grass and lounging in the Kansas sun. And just like every year, they will return to the farm in the fall to prepare for calving season next winter.

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