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The Kansan - Newton, KS
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Tips on entertaining, new product reviews, simple recipes and more from GateHouse News Service. Learn about nutrition, new and \x34trendy\x34 foods you may see at the market, and food and cooking vocabulary. Take our weekly quiz and get a weekly ...
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Tips on entertaining, new product reviews, simple recipes and more from GateHouse News Service. Learn about nutrition, new and \x34trendy\x34 foods you may see at the market, and food and cooking vocabulary. Take our weekly quiz and get a weekly cookbook review.
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These days, many people are re-evaluating their diets to lower cholesterol and fat. They're looking closely at foods to eliminate or cut back. One item that shouldn't be on the chopping block is lean beef.



It may be surprising, but lean and extra lean beef are nutrient-rich sources of protein that complement a low-fat diet. In fact, a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a healthy lean diet that includes lean beef as well as fruit, whole grains, vegetables and nuts, showed similar effects on cardiovascular disease as a similar diet without lean beef. In the study, people using either diet showed a reduction in LDL cholesterol compared to those eating the typical healthy American diet. 



Mitzi Dulan, a nationally recognized nutrition and wellness expert and team sports nutritionist for the Kansas City Royals, understands that lean meat is an essential part of a healthy diet. "Lean and extra lean beef have tremendous nutritional benefits and provide more bang for your buck to healthy diets," said Dulan. "Adding lean beef into meals is a quick and easy way to inject necessary protein in your diet, in a low-fat, heart healthy way."



Classic Beef Stew



1  tablespoon oil



2  pounds Laura's Lean Eye of Round Roast cut into 2-inch cubes



2  cups sliced onions



4  cloves garlic, chopped



1  green bell pepper, sliced



4  large celery stalks, cut into 2-inch pieces



8  medium carrots



4  large baking potatoes (about 2 pounds) cut into eighths



1  28-ounce can whole tomatoes



1  15-ounce can tomato sauce



1  tablespoon soy sauce



1  teaspoon Worcestershire sauce



1  cup fat-free beef stock (double strength)



1  tablespoon dried basil



Salt and pepper to taste



Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.



Heat oil in skillet. On medium-high heat, sear meat cubes in skillet until browned on all sides.



In a separate bowl, combine canned tomatoes, tomato sauce, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, beef stock, basil, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly. Pour mixture over meat and vegetables in roasting pan.



Cover and bake for 45 minutes. Reduce heat to 250 degrees F and bake for 2 hours or until meat is very tender to the fork. Baste occasionally.



-- Family Features

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