To keynote errors hurled against us last week, a letter to the editor persisted we were The World Day Of Prayer.  Everybody else knew better.

Within the context of “shrieks turned to venomous screams and name calling,” we can only stress that we knelt on the courthouse basement concrete floor to call upon the name of the Lord Jesus, truly.


To keynote errors hurled against us last week, a letter to the editor persisted we were The World Day Of Prayer.  Everybody else knew better.
Within the context of “shrieks turned to venomous screams and name calling,” we can only stress that we knelt on the courthouse basement concrete floor to call upon the name of the Lord Jesus, truly.
Dare we to have prayed for President Obama to be enlisted in the pro-life cause or for an old-fashioned, Heaven-sent, Holy Ghost, New Testament revival, among other things?
We were brokenly, humbly on our knees in the large community room there for perhaps no more than 20 minutes or a half-hour praying. Sweetly, quietly, orderly, one by one voluntarily, occasionally with soft tears.
We were under orders, Bible orders at that, from II Timothy 2:1-2: “... prayers for kings and all that are in authority ...”
There, at the 20th Newton National Day of Prayer, the mayor of the city solemnly spoke aloud the names of our commissioners at the county level, as well.
He spoke the fire, sheriff and police chief’s names for their men and the EMS. To each, we added a soft “Amen” or kindred prayerful plea.
We almost forgot our CIA, FBI, Secret Service and armed forces intelligence, all unsung heroes who often unreportedly lay down their lives to thwart bomb plots, agricultural poisoning, etc.
We prayed our vets neither be forsaken nor forgotten, especially our active-duty service people who right now “stand between their loved homes and the war’s desolation” (National Anthem).
There was a separate accusation of being a pro-life rally at that May 6 Newton National Day Of Prayer. What a supreme compliment!
First and I foremost, we were a legitimate, genuine prayer meeting.
Even so, at the national headquarters of the National Day Of Prayer in Colorado Springs, Colo., saving the lives of preborn babies headed for abortion is a passion.
Those relatively faithful few in the courthouse basement here were the prayer nucleus who found their way between three days predictions that included possible tornado touchings among storms.
They formed a hand-held circle to conclude, singing, “Blest Be the Tie” and quietly went home.

— Pastor Vern Bender,
Newton