Where is our compassion? With the Haitian earthquake before us and our dismay over the loss of life and human suffering, we are plenty willing to contribute money and send relief workers.


Where is our compassion? With the Haitian earthquake before us and our dismay over the loss of life and human suffering, we are plenty willing to contribute money and send relief workers.

When Greensburg was hit with the tornado, Kansans contributed money and personal efforts.

We are known in other countries for our individual and government help in such circumstances.

However, when it came to getting a health-care bill passed by Congress, we collectively seemed to forget compassion and measures that would provide care to everyone.

Congress has reacted as usual with partisan politics and bowing to special interest groups.

The American public has become confused and feels cutting costs translates to less care and, in general, would not want to change the system.

Criticism always is brought up that no one wants to wait months for surgery as they do in Canada and Great Britain, and translates changes to rationing.

We have come to believe surgery is the answer to most everything.

We want the “quick fix!”

Most chronic conditions are best dealt with over time by “mid-level” practitioners such as family practice physicians and nurse practitioners, as well as specialists in specific fields such as rheumatology and physical medicine.

Yet these professionals are not given the respect or pay to do their jobs well.

In the passage of the health-care bills, we also became concerned someone who needed care was not really eligible and society would have to foot the bill.

We are anyway; it’s just at an expensive level. Where is our compassion for those in need at home?

Now I read that the Supreme Court has ruled corporations and special interest groups can contribute direct funding to support political candidates.

That appears to rule out all possibility we will ever bow to compassion rather than profit.

— Jessie Bryant,

Newton