There is a scene late in the movie “The Godfather” where Michael Corleone is attending the baptism of his nephew, answering the priest’s questions as the young boy’s Godfather


There is a scene late in the movie “The Godfather” where Michael Corleone is attending the baptism of his nephew, answering the priest’s questions as the young boy’s Godfather.

While Corleone is answering such questions as “Do you renounce the Devil?” the movie cuts to scenes of the family’s enemies being killed in brutal fashion.

The past couple of days have repeated the scene in the NFL, where commissioner Roger Goodell is christening the upcoming playoffs while coaches are gunned down one-by-one.

The first body was found early Monday morning near Allen Park, Mich., where Rod Marinelli was devoured by (the) Lions after the worst season in NFL history.

Romeo Crennel was found soon after floating in the Cuyahoga River outside of Browns Stadium after a 4-12 season.

The Jets’ Eric Mangini body may never be found, as it is believed to be somewhere in the New Jersey swamps outside the Meadowlands, somewhere near where Jimmy Hoffa and numerous victims of Tony Soprano and Vito Corleone now make their final resting place.

The final victim of the current carnage, and the most surprising, is Mike Shanahan, who despite two Super Bowl titles, was buried in an avalanche after the Broncos were broken by the Chargers.

Kansas City’s Herm Edwards is bunkered in Arrowhead Stadium surrounded by bodyguards. Edwards’ safety has been in question even before owner Clark Hunt gave Chiefs’ president and GM Carl Peterson the kiss of death. Peterson was found hanging from a bridge at the I-70/I-435 intersection soon thereafter.

Unlike real life and “The Godfather” movies, when a coach, assistant coach or GM is killed off, he often is resurrected somewhere else as a coach or front-office staffer or as a television commentator. Sometimes a coach remains in limbo for a time while living off the financial settlement because there are years remaining on the contract.

Some years, coaches firing or quitting begins a league-wide game of musical chairs.

Mark Schnabel is the sports editor for the Kansan.