David Becker found his dream job in the southwest corner of Harvey County — he’s finally become the chief of police.

“This has been my goal, my dream, since I got into law enforcement,” Becker said.


David Becker found his dream job in the southwest corner of Harvey County — he’s finally become the chief of police.

“This has been my goal, my dream, since I got into law enforcement,” Becker said.

He officially took the reins of the Burrton Police Department in September after serving as interim chief.

While wearing the interim hat, he also was working part-time as a patrol officer in neighboring Halstead.

He’s served on the Halstead Police Department for four years, and plans to continue working with HPD if he can do so.

But he also knows he has a job to do in Burrton — though most would stereotype Burrton as a sleepy little town, there is still a lot of work for a police chief.

“I am going to continue with the (Students Against Drunk Driving) program in school, and try and build a stronger relationship with the school and students.” Becker said. “We are looking for a full-time officer, and it’s in the budget to hire one.”

Plus there is training. A police officer and chief is a life-long learner.

“We will keep our training up,” Becker said. “With small department, that is a hard thing to do. That’s one thing (Halstead chief Matt) Neal and I have discussed — cooperative training.”

Becker said his working with Halstead, and a working relationship with the Harvey County Sheriff’s Office, will help make sure the city is covered while officers are in training or on vacation.

The Burrton Police Department employs three part-time officers in addition to Becker.

There’s one unmarked patrol car.

“We’re marking a car to let people know it belongs to the city of Burrton,” Becker said.

It’s quite a change from his only law enforcement job outside of Kansas — when he was an officer with in Apache Junction, Ariz., a city of more than 31,000.

“I wanted to get a larger-city experience,” Becker said.

Becker also has been a police officer in Goodland — starting his career in law enforcement in 1998 and advancing to the rank of corporal before leaving in 2003.

He was drawn to Harvey County by a job with the Halstead department and a brother who lived in Hutchinson.

“Once we got here, we liked it,” Becker said. “You can go to Wichita, Newton and Hutch from here.”

He said he likes the small-town life, and he wants to meet as many people from Burrton as possible.

To that end, his office door, which is just off the city council chambers on Main Street, will almost always be open.

“When my car is out front and door is unlocked, people are more than welcome to stop by,” Becker said. “They can stop and say hello, and if they have a complaint to talk to me about it. I’m a people person, and I believe in community policing.”